Neel Dongre Awards for Excellence in Photography 2016-17

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India Photo Archive Foundation

Invites

Proposals & Submissions

For

The 5th Edition of Neel Dongre Awards/Grants for Excellence in Photography 2016-17

www.indiaphotoarchive.org

 

The India Photo Archive Foundation aims to encourage amateur/professional photographers, and engage a wider discourse on the content, politics and aesthetics of photography.

The Neel Dongre Awards for Excellence in Photography aims to create a visual platform, where photographers can get an opportunity to showcase their work to relevant audience and get notice, receive funds to support their projects, required equipment, and study material to further support their passion. These awards seek to encourage budding artists and documentary photo practitioners from various genres on a national level thus not only creating a platform for aspiring photographers but also using it as a medium to encourage a visual dialogue in the field.

This year’s theme Life as Beauty: The Vanishing Crafts of India’

Kindly visit http://www.indiaphotoarchive.org/-/awards-grants/awards-grants1 for more information on rules and regulations.  

 

Deadline – 30th July 2016

 

Life as Beauty:
The Vanishing Crafts of India

Craftspeople, it is said, are the “artists of the everyday”. We could begin here with the very words “arts” and “crafts”. In the Indian ethos no distinction is made between the two, either in concept or language, for the man who works with his hands creates anew each time he sits at the loom or the potter’s wheel, bringing his skill as a craftsman to improvise as an artist. In this world-view, all craftsmen are indeed artists.

In earlier times the hands of the craftsman determined every expression of our daily lives. They fashioned the clothes and jewellery we wore, the dishes we ate out of, the vessels we used for water; they created our homes and places of worship and all that was in them: in short, they touched each aspect of our lives as individuals and as communities. They worked in diverse materials with diverse tools. Wood, bronze, stone, terra cotta, cloth, palm leaves and bamboo were only a few among them.

For centuries textiles formed the supremely Indian art. Traditionally, the processing of yarn and weaving of textiles was the second largest occupation after agriculture; quite often the two were intertwined. Across the great textile areas in the country thousands of families spun and wove, dyed, painted, printed, embroidered. The craft of textiles, nurtured for thousands of years, encompassed a wide variety of types and usages, from the finest of cottons, silks and wools to cheaper and coarser textures for everyday use, from gossamer garments and delicate shawls to floor coverings and travelling tents.

Terra cotta and textiles are only two of the great Indian crafts. But what was once intrinsic to our living has been overtaken by industrial manufacture, synthetic materials and just plain obsolescence. Skill sets nourished by generations of teaching and absorption are fading away for lack of practice: are we then in an age of vanishing crafts? Perhaps yes and perhaps not quite.

It is difficult to pinpoint “dying” crafts, as some have proven to be cyclical and can spring back to life when revived by changing fashions, lifestyles or renewed interest. Examples are indigo dyeing and mashru weaving.  But not all craft forms are as fortunate. Some might be termed “languishing” crafts: and some phase themselves out through a variety of processes.

For example, some craft objects are no longer functionally relevant, or else are very costly; an example is the metal mirror from Kerala. In other cases, such as phulkari from Punjab, the social circumstances and milieu in which the craft flourished no longer exist.  And there are materials – such as shahtoosh and ivory – which are banned for conservation reasons, wiping out any further production of crafts objects. Market forces, such as limited customer appeal in relation to the cost of production, discourage the weaving of certain types of textiles such as the thick coarse handloom saris of Andhra and Tamil Nadu. And other threatened crafts include bidri, puppet making, and traditional paper toys.

Artistically we may mourn the loss of certain materials, techniques and traditions. But pragmatically we have to remember that all craft must perhaps reshape itself to what is current to retain a dynamic and sustaining power. The biggest challenge is to create an encouraging climate through continuing and guaranteed patronage. Skills flourish when demands exist, and it is precisely in the creation of such demands that the future lies.

(With thanks to Ms Laila Tyabji, Chairman, Dastkaar, for her valuable inputs)


Neel Dongre Awards for Excellence in Photography in media

The Asian Age, 11th June 2016 – Exhibit on visual interpretation of recycling, waste management. 

http://www.asianage.com/delhi/exhibit-visual-interpretation-recycling-waste-management-388

 

The Hans India, 11th of May 2016 – ‘Digging the World of Recycle’

http://www.thehansindia.com/posts/index/Hyderabad-Tab/2016-05-11/Digging-the-World-of-Recycle/227305


The Hindu 7th April – ‘Showcasing India’s Dirty Laundry’

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Delhi/showcasing-indias-dirty-laundry/article8443677.ece

 

The Wire, 8th April 2016 – Gallery: The Public Secret of the ‘World of Recycle’

http://thewire.in/2016/04/08/gallery-the-public-secret-of-the-world-of-recycle-28179/

 

The Hindu, 13th April 2016 –

http://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/swarat-ghosh-a-recipient-of-neel-dongre-grant-for-photography-turns-his-lens-on-rag-pickers-in-hyderabad/article8471289.ece

 

Better Photography, 2nd March 2015 – ‘Bajaatey Raho: Neel Dongre Awards/Grants by India Photo Archive Foundation’ –

http://betterphotography.in/events/bajaatey-raho-neel-dongre-awardsgrants-by-india-photo-archive-foundation/37310/

 

The Hindu, 17th March 2015 – ‘Wedding Cheerleaders’ –

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Delhi/wedding-cheerleaders/article7001399.ece

 

Deccan Herald, 19th March 2015 – ‘Trumpeters of Joyous Times’ –

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/466478/trumpeters-joyous-times.html

 

The Asian Age, 20th March 2015 – ‘Band Baaja Diaries’ –

http://www.asianage.com/arts/band-baaja-diaries-939

Neel Dongre Award/Grants For Excellence In Photography 2015-16

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neel dongre logo copy-2

India Photo Archive Foundation

Invites

Proposals & Submissions

For

The 4th edition of Neel Dongre Awards/Grants for Excellence in Photography 2015-16

www.indiaphotoarchive.org

The India Photo Archive Foundation aims to encourage amateur/professional photographers, and engage a wider discourse on the content, politics and aesthetics of photography.

The Neel Dongre Awards for Excellence in Photography aims to create a visual platform, where photographers can get an opportunity to showcase their work to relevant audience and get notice, receive funds to support their projects, required equipment, and study material to further support their passion. These Rewards seek to encourage budding artists and documentary photo practitioners from various genres on a national level thus not only creating a platform for aspiring photographers but also using it as a medium to encourage a visual dialogue in the field.

“I would like to applaud the effort of India Photo Archive Foundation first, for giving the opportunity to six photographers, and then also to create this seminal documentation of a peculiar performance practice which is so much a part of our social and cultural life ironically quietly.” – Parthiv Shah on ‘Bajaatey Raho, a collaborative photographic project under the aegis of Neel Dongre Awards/Grants for Excellence in Photography (2014).’

For more information on rules and regulations kindly log on to http://www.indiaphotoarchive.org/

Deadline – 31st August 2015

The Hindu, 17th March 2015 – ‘Wedding Cheerleaders’ –

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Delhi/wedding-cheerleaders/article7001399.ece

Deccan Herald, 19th March 2015 – ‘Trumpeters of Joyous Times’ –

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/466478/trumpeters-joyous-times.html

The Asian Age, 20th March 2015 – ‘Band Baaja Diaries’ –

http://www.asianage.com/arts/band-baaja-diaries-939

NEEL DONGRE AWARDS/GRANTS FOR EXCELLENCE IN PHOTOGRAPHY INDIA PHOTO ARCHIVE FOUNDATION 2013

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Poster 11March

The Neel Dongre Awards/Grants for Excellence in Photography

‘Millennium Dreams’

With the coming of the digital age, we have witnessed the rise of a visual culture where photography as a profession and art has evolved giving rise to a plethora of genres, attracting talented minds. However, many of these budding visual artists go unnoticed due to the lack of support in the form of institutes with adequate equipment, funds, scholarships, and relevant platforms to display and publish their work. The Neel Dongre Awards/Grants for Excellence in Photography is an initiative aimed at bridging this gap.

These Awards/Grants are meant for professional/non-professional photographers who have produced an ongoing/finished body of work in any genre of photography; Social Documentary, Photojournalism, Fine Art etc.

“Millennium Dreams” is a photography exhibition under the aegis of Neel Dongre Awards/Grants for Excellence in Photography by India Photo Archive Foundation. This project aims at providing a visual interpretation of the Millennium city-Gurgaon.

 The Foundation presents a collaborative photographic project by eleven photographers presenting different interpretations of Gurgaon through distinctive artistic, documentary styles; and curated by Aditya Arya, practitioner, a photo historian and archivist.

Artists – Ajay Sood, Arvind Hoon, Aparna Mohindra, Chandan Gomes, Manoj Bharti Gupta, Monica Tiwari, Natisha Mallick, Saumya Khandelwal, Vaibhav Bhardwaj, Vicky Roy, Vinit Gupta.

Preview and inauguration on the 1st of April at 6 p.m at the India International Centre Exhibition continues from the 2nd to 12th of April 2014.

A New Mamiya 645 added to the ‘Museo Camera’ Collection!

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Thank you Pradeep Dasgupta for yet another Mamiya 645.

Mamiya Camera Company, still a strong player in the medium-format professional film and digital camera market, was founded May 10,1940 by businessman Tsunejiro Sugawara and engineer Seichi Mamiya, as Mamiya Koki Seisakusho.

The Mamiya M645 is the first series of 4.5×6 SLRs made by Mamiya. The finder and screens are interchangeable, but there is no magazine back, only preloadable film inserts. All the M645 models share the same accessories (finders, screens, lenses, grips and inserts). The lenses and inserts can also be attached on the later Mamiya 645 models

The original M645 appeared in 1975. It has knob advance and shutter speeds from 8s to 1/500. It supports a mirror lockup and double exposure lever. Flash sync is 1/60 sec.

It is a 6×4.5 images camera. It means that it is slightly inferior to a 6×6 or 6×7, but remains far larger than a 24×36. It gives you the compromise of more images per roll (15 or 16 depending on film spacing).
The film holder can be fully removed from the back, quite conveniently, and can be change for a 220 version if you can still find those films.


 

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

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Latest addition to the Museo Camera Collection – Polaroid Land Camera Model 95 with flash #200! Thanks to Gautam Hemmady.

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

Polaroid Land Camera Model 95

The invention of modern instant cameras is generally credited to American scientist Edwin Land, who unveiled the first commercial instant camera, the Land Camera, in 1948, a year after unveiling instant film in New York City. The earliest instant camera, which consisted of a camera and portable darkroom in a single compartment, was invented in 1923 by Samuel Shlafrock.


The Model 95 is the first of Edwin Land’s instant picture cameras. Starting in 1948 the Polaroid Corporation in Rochester made at least 1.5 million of the Model 95 folding viewfinder camera for his instant roll film, including the variants 95, 95A and 95B.

The first of these is recognisable having a spring sighting pin as part of the viewfinder, while the later ones have a wire frame. The model name is written on the face plate of the camera.

Kodak Duaflex

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Kodak Duaflex

Kodak Duaflex

Kodak Duaflex

Kodak Duaflex

Latest addition to the museum; a Kodak Duaflex 1949-1951

Gifted by Vivek Uberoi

The Kodak Duaflex is a 620 roll film bpseudo TLR made by Kodak in the US, Canada, and UK. The original versions were available from December 1947 – September 1950 in the US, and 1949-1955 in the UK; the Duaflex IV was finally discontinued in the US in March 1960.

The various Duaflexes had Bakelite bodies (identified by Kodak as “Kodadur”) with metal fittings and trim, and were available with either a simple fixed focus 75mm f/15 Kodet lens, or with a 72mm f/8 Kodar triplet lens in a front-element focusing (to 3.5 ft.) mount. The Kodar lens had Waterhouse stops of f/8, 11, and 16. The shutter had speeds of “I” and “B”, and was synched for use with a Kodalite Flasholder. Early U.S.-made models (Duaflex and Duaflex II) had a dedicated Duaflex Flasholder, which was synchronized for SM and SF bulbs when the camera was set on “I”. No. 5 and No. 25 bulbs could be used, but the “B” setting was required for those types. Later models (Duaflex III and IV) were modified to accept the aforementioned Kodalite Flasholder, which was also used on the Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model and other Kodak models.

A special feature of the Duaflex line was double-exposure prevention, meaning the advance knob had to be turned to the next exposure before the shutter could be activated. This feature could be overridden by pushing the little lever below the shutter button.

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‘Museo Camera’ in Gulf News

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‘Museo Camera’ in Gulf News

‘A Unique Museum To Celebrate Photography’, 6th February 2014

“The curator Aditya Arya traces both the evolution of camera technology and piquant moments from the birth and early days of the Indian republic…”

-By Nilima Pathak

http://gulfnews.com/news/asia/india/a-unique-museum-to-celebrate-photography-1.1287415

KIEV ARSENAL

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In the ’50’s, the Arsenal Plant in the Ukraine and the KMZ plant in Moscow began to produce a variety of designs which would eventually consolidate into the Kiev 88. There are some significant improvements in the Soviet design over the Swedish original, as Hasselblad had by then abandoned the design.

The Kiev camera was originally made with machinery removed by the Russians from the Contax Zeiss factory in Dresden, Germany at the end of Second World War.

The production was started at the Arsenal works (Zavod) in Kiev, Ukraine, initially from salvaged German Contax parts. The Kiev 35mm rangefinder cameras were in production between 1947-87. Like their Contax relatives, they suffer from reliability problems associated with the very complex shutter mechanism, which unfortunately are very difficult to repair.

As the Arsenal factory grew they slowly improved on the Contax design.

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